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If you have a diagnosis of allergies, especially if this is an anaphylaxis reaction (severe life threatening allergy) you or your parents/carers will need to inform your school so that a care plan can be put into place. You may already have a care plan written for school from your specialist nurse or GP, this can be brought into school. 

You and your parents or carers responsibilities if you require adrenaline auto injector pens will receive ongoing prescriptions from their GP. Adrenaline auto injector pens last for 18 months. Schools are able to purchase emergency adrenaline auto injector pens if additional are required. Find out more from at Anaphylaxis UK.

Make sure that the school are aware that you have your adrenaline auto injector pens with you and where you keep them. Your parent / carer may need to sign a consent form for this. Always tell an appropriate adult when you use your auto injector pen.

Ensure both of your adrenaline auto injector pens are in date! Don’t wait until this has expired to get a new one prescribed, plan ahead.
All medication will need to be labelled with your name and date of birth by the pharmacists. Liquid or tablet antihistamines should also be labelled and kept by the school.

You will need to have your adrenaline auto injector pen with you on any school trips, swimming, after school clubs and for sports; you will need to discuss this with you teacher. Attend all medical appointments. Each school has a named school nurse who you can speak to if you have any worries.

Helpful resources

Allergy UK and the Anaphylaxis Campaign provide lots of helpful resources to support you with your Allergy.

If you have a diagnosis of asthma or hay fever you or your parents/carers should inform your school so that a care plan can be put into place for you. You and your parents or carers responsibilities know your condition and the signs and symptoms; this will need to be included in your care plan.

Make sure that you have your inhaler and spacer available in school, depending on your age and school you may be able to carry this around with you. Make sure that the school are aware of this! A parent/carer may need to sign a consent form. 

Always note the time that you take your medication. Ensure your inhaler is in date! Don’t wait until this has expired to get a new one prescribed, think ahead. Don’t forget to take this home at the end of the school year – your spacer will need to be washed with hot water and dried by an appropriate adult. If you leave your inhaler and spacer with your school make sure that the spacer is kept in a sealed bag, this prevents infection.

All medication will need to be labelled with your name and date of birth by the pharmacists. Liquid or tablet antihistamines should be kept by the school. Do not use your friend’s medication if you have forgotten yours! Tell an appropriate adult. You will need to have your inhaler with you on any school trips, swimming, after school clubs and for sports; you will need to discuss this with your teacher.

Take your medication when you need it, as prescribed. Tell an appropriate adult when you start to feel unwell (your teacher may consider extra time for you if this is during exams or sporting activities).

Attend all medical appointments. You should have an annual asthma review with your GP or specialist asthma team to monitor your asthma. Each school has a named school nurse who you can speak to if you have any worries.

Helpful resources

Asthma UK provides lots of helpful resources to support you with your asthma.

NHS resources

If you have a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or attention deficit disorder (ADD) or are being assessed for either condition you or your parents/carers should inform your school so they can offer support as required. If any medication needs to be given a care plan will need to be put in place. 

You and your parents or carers responsibilities know your condition, tell an appropriate adult when you are feeling unwell, this may include feeling extra angry, stressed and frustrated. If you have to take medication in school; ensure your medication is in date! Don’t wait until this has expired to get a new one prescribed, plan ahead.

All medication will need to be labelled with your name and date of birth by the pharmacists. Do not use your friend’s medication if you have forgotten yours! Tell an appropriate adult. Take your medication when you need it, as prescribed. Attend all medical appointments. Each school has a named school nurse who you can speak to if you have any worries.

Helpful resources

The Autism Society and YoungMinds provide lots of helpful resources to support you with your ADHD

NHS resources

If you have a diagnosis of diabetes you or your parents/carers will need to inform your school so that a care plan can be put into place. Your school nurse can also support you and your school if you have any ongoing concerns about your diabetes.

You and your parents or carers responsibilities

  • Know your signs and symptoms for hypo’s and hyper’s, this will need to be included in your care plan.
  • Ensure your medication is in date! Including the one you may have left with the school. Don’t wait until this has expired to get a new one prescribed, plan ahead.
  • All medication will need to be labelled with your name and date of birth by the pharmacists.
  • Do not use your friend’s medication if you have forgotten yours! Tell an appropriate adult.
  • You will need to have your medication with you on any school trips, swimming, after school clubs and for sports; you may need to discuss this with your teacher.
  • Take your medication when you need it as prescribed
  • If you plan to carry your medication / glucose tablets / biscuits / snacks on you at school, make sure that the school are aware of this! A parent / carer may need to sign a consent form. Always note the time that you take your medication.
  • Tell an appropriate adult if you start to feel unwell (your teacher may consider extra time for you if this is during exams or sporting activities)
  • Attend all medical appointments.

Helpful resources

NHS resources

If you have a diagnosis of epilepsy you or your parents/carers will need to inform your school so that a care plan can be put into place. 

You and your parents or carers responsibilities know your condition and the signs and symptoms; this will need to be included in your care plan. If you have to take medication in school or have emergency medication; ensure your medication is in date! Don’t wait until this has expired to get a new one prescribed, plan ahead.

All medication will need to be labelled with your name and date of birth by the pharmacists. Do not use your friend’s medication if you have forgotten yours! Tell an appropriate adult. You will need to have your emergency medication (If appropriate) with you on any school trips, swimming, after school clubs and for sports; you will need to discuss this with your teacher.

Take your medication when you need it, as prescribed if you are responsible for your own medication at school, make sure that the school are aware of this! A parent / carer may need to sign a consent form. Always note the time that you take your medication.

Tell an appropriate adult if you start to feel unwell (your teacher may consider extra time for you if this is during exams or sporting activities). Attend all medical appointments.

Helpful resources

Young Epilepsy and the Epilepsy Society provide lots of helpful resources to support you with your Epilepsy.

NHS resources

Young people’s bowel and bladder problems include bedwetting, daytime wetting, constipation and soiling and it is estimated that 900,000 or 1 in 12, 5-19 year olds suffer from a bowel or bladder condition. If you experience one of these it can be very stressful and impact on you, especially around school, school trips or staying at friends’ houses.

Most bowel and bladder problems are avoidable and treatable and you or your parent/carer can contact the school nurse attached to your school who will be able to provide advice and link you in with local services that can provide advice, support and treatment. The Children’s Bowel and Bladder Charity (ERIC) have lots of fantastic resources which you can find on their website.

Information on bowel and bladder problems

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Contact us

CLCH Head Office

Ground Floor 15
Marylebone Road
London  NW1 5JD


Telephone: 020 7798 1300

PALS: clchpals@nhs.net

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